Circular cycling path made of bottom ash

Between Denekamp and Nordhorn lies the first fully circular cycling path in Twente. Bottom ash from Twence has been integrated into the foundation of this cycling path. This spares the use of primary raw materials sand and gravel.

Header Circulair fietspad bodemas Twence thumb

Bottom ash as a foundation

Washed bottom ash from Twence can be used as a residual substance after incinerating residual waste and recovering valuable materials, for example in road construction. In 2020, bottom ash was used in the foundation of the 770-metre-long cycling path between Denekamp and Nordhorn (Germany). The foundation is made of recycled rubble from the old, worn-out cycling path, whereby the concrete fraction has largely been replaced by washed bottom ash. No new material was needed as a result.

Sustainability in the chain

The Ecofalt top layer is a sustainable alternative to asphalt, in which the petroleum-based substance (bitumen) has largely been replaced by biobased products. As a result, fewer fossil raw materials are needed. In contrast to regular asphalt, Ecofalt is produced at ambient temperatures, which means that heating it with natural gas is not necessary. The CO2 reduction for the cycling path, through cutting down on the use of primary raw materials, is about 13 metric tonnes. The cycling path was laid by Abbink Boekelo Wegenbouw together with the Twee “R” Recycling Group and Twence. The Province of Overijssel was the commissioning party for the project.

Circulair fietspad bodemas Twence thumb

Contributing to the circular economy

The recycling of waste products, such as bottom ash, is in line with our ambition to contribute to the circular economy. Bottom ash can be used as a substitute for primary raw materials such as sand and gravel. Bottom ash has already been used in the production of cement clinkers and the laying of a railway viaduct near Deurningen. It has also been used in the top layer at the former Rikkerink landfill site in Ambt-Delden. The new Solar Park 't Rikkerink is being built on top of this foundation.

Bodemas fietspad Twence thumb

How do you make use of bottom ash?

Bottom ash is what remains after incinerating non-reusable residual waste. This ash lies at the bottom of the incinerator, hence the name bottom ash. In the bottom ash recycling plant, we extract practically all of the metals. Washed bottom ash is suitable for further processing as a freely applicable building material.

This is how we constructed the first circular cycling path made of bottom ash in Twente!

Zo realiseerden we het eerste circulaire fietspad van bodemas in Twente!

Results

100 herbruikbaar
100% recyclable materials
The road surface of the cycling path along the N342 between Denekamp and Nordhorn is made of 100% recyclable materials. In other words, a fully sustainable cycling path.
Innovatie
New foundation
2R Recycling has developed a new foundation especially for this cycling path made of recycled rubble materials and bottom ash. We worked closely with Twee "R" Recycling Group on this.
CO2 reductie
CO2 reduction
With the construction of this cycling path, the annual gas consumption of four households was spared through the reduction of the use of primary raw materials. That's a CO2 reduction of around 13 metric tonnes.
Jan Schuttebeld links Twence

"The composition of this mix is an absolute innovation and revolution for road construction. We are expecting a great deal from it."

Jan Schuttenbeld (left), director of Two "R" Recycling
Twence 27 5 217717 Jeffrey Martinec thumb

"In 2019, we succeeded in turning the clean bottom ash and the mixture from Twee "R" Recycling into a foundation mix that is sustainable and suitable for road construction."

Jeffrey Martinec, product manager Twence

Contact us

Any questions or comments?

Do you have any questions about the circular cycling path? Or would you like more information about the use of bottom ash? We'd love to hear what's on your mind. Please fill in the form and we will get in touch with you.

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Jeffrey Martinec LinkedIn